Journal : Global Times (Chinese) Date : Author : GT special correspondent in India Liu Cheng and GT special correspondent Liu Haoran Page No. : 4
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GT special correspondent in India Liu Cheng and GT special correspondent Liu Haoran

3 years ago, the Delhi bus rape in India had shocked the world. British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) using it as a theme has made a documentary film “India’s daughter”; the film was scheduled to be aired on March 8, International women’s day. However, the unexpected ban by Indian authorities just a few days before its broadcast in India on the plea that the issue was sensitive and could create public disturbance, has aroused much controversy.

The American Cable News Network (CNN) on March 4 quoted a Delhi Police spokesperson as saying, the local court has banned the broadcast of the documentary as it has the potential risk of creating disorder in society; police has already registered a case against such an incident. Indian channels as well as all the foreign channels which can be accessed by Indian viewers have been barred from telecasting the documentary. The attitude of the Indian authorities has puzzled the documentary filmmaker Udwin. She says, filming of the documentary had the approval not only of the victim’s family but also of the Indian Home Ministry and the prison authorities prior to the interview. According to BBC, any attempt to stop the film’s broadcast would be a violation of the right to freedom of expression. On March 4, the New Delhi Television channel (NDTV) website published a letter by Udwin drawing Indian Prime Minister Modi’s attention to the matter.

CNN says, the part of the BBC documentary which has worried the authorities the most is the 9 minute long interview with Musha (Mukesh), one of the main perpetrators of the bus rape crime. This murderer appears to have no regrets whatsoever while facing the camera and instead says forcefully, “decent girls should not be roaming around outside at 9’o clock in the night………….we have the right to teach them a lesson.” He said, had she not fought back, she could have “very well been alive”. According to Reuters, Indian Home Minister Rajnath Singh pointed out on March 4 that BBC filmmakers had committed irregularities while making the film; after shooting in the jail; they did not show the unedited version of the interview to the jail authorities, as required by the rules. He also added that that the arrogant remarks made by Musha (Mukesh) are “highly derogatory” and an insult to  womanhood.

印度封杀BBC公交强奸案纪录片

本报驻印度特约记者刘成本报特约记者刘皓然

三年前,印度德里发生公交强奸案令世界震惊。英国广播公司(BBC)以此事为题拍摄纪录片《印度的女儿》,该片本拟在今年3月8日国际妇女节上映。令人意想不到的是,印度当局日前以内容敏感、容易造成骚乱为由,禁止该片在印度播出,引发争议。

美国有线电视新闻网(CNN)4日援引德里警方发言人的话称,由于BBC这部纪录片存在导致社会骚乱的潜在危险,地方法庭禁止该片播出,警方也已经针对该事件立案。届时,无论是印度电视台还是印度所能收看到的国外电视频道,均不得播映此片。印度当局的做法令纪录片的制片人乌德温感到不解。她表示,该片的拍摄不仅得到受害者家属的认同,片中的采访此前也已获得印度内政部和狱方负责人的批准。BBC方面称,任何试图阻止该片上映的行为都是对自由言论的侵犯。印度新德里电视台(NDTV)网站4日刊登了乌德温的来信,信中呼吁印度总理莫迪对此事予以关注。

CNN称,BBC的纪录片最令印度当局“揪心”的部分,当属媒体对“公交强奸案”的主犯之一慕沙进行的一段时长约9分钟的采访。面对镜头,这名凶犯显得全无悔意,反而振振有词表示,“体面的女孩不会晚上9点还在外面闲逛……我们有权为她们上一课。”他表示,如果受害者不挣扎,可能现在还“好好地活着”。路透社称,印度内政部长拉杰纳特·辛格4日表示,BBC的制片人在该片制作过程中存在“违规操作”,他们在监狱拍摄后,并未按规定向狱方负责人展示完整版的采访过程。拉杰纳特称慕沙的嚣张言论“充满贬损含义”,是对女性的侮辱。

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